Flying Squirrel Community Space

Who we are

The Flying Squirrel is a welcoming space for artists, activists, and community members in Rochester. We aim to cultivate and sustain long lasting relationships so we can work together to create positive social change.

More about us.

  • 285 Clarissa St. Rochester NY, 14608
  • 585-205-8778

What's Happening?

Using the Space

Need a space to hold your event? We'd love to work with you. We host all kinds of events including group meetings, private parties, music shows, film screenings, speakers, and more.

March Monday Mayhem: Find out about City Roots Community Land Trust!

Come find out about a new Community Land Trust in Rochester, NY! Not sure what that is or what it means? Join us for March Monday Mayhem as members of the City Roots CLT come to the Flying Squirrel to talk about their work, how you can get involved, and answer your questions!

Monday, March 5, 2018
7:00pm - 9:00pm
Flying Squirrel Community Space
285 Clarissa St.
Rochester, NY
Donations welcome!
Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/517211402005980/

About City Roots Community Land Trust:
Established in 2016, the City Roots CLT is a community-driven organization which works to establish and promote permanently-affordable, quality housing in Rochester, NY. Their website: https://www.cityrootsclt.org/

City Roots' Mission:
The City Roots Community Land Trust’s mission is to permanently preserve housing affordability in Rochester, New York through community owned and managed land, to empower neighbors, and to bridge socioeconomic divisions.

City Roots' Vision:
The City Roots Community Land Trust vision is to strengthen the Rochester community by cultivating the perspective that land owned by the community can help make housing a human right and affordable for all. We are a collaborative of homeowners, renters, youth, community allies and partners.

About Monday Mayhem:
On the first Monday of every month, the Flying Squirrel hosts special programming that forgoes the technical and logistical concerns of running an open-use community space in order to take a closer look at the impact of our actions on the community and our potential as a catalyst for change.

Watch "July '64" a part of EIE's film and discussion series

Enough Is Enough presents a screening of "July ’64"!

Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2018
7:00pm - 9:00pm
Flying Squirrel Community Space
285 Clarissa St.
Rochester, NY
Suggested donation: $5
Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/418273328606960/

About “July ’64”:
The night of Friday, July 24th, 1964 started off normally enough in Rochester New York, stiflingly hot and humid; but by the next morning no one would look at race relations in the North the same again. July ‘64 takes a penetrating look at the underlying causes of the riots or urban insurrections that swept through Black communities like wildfires that summer and in years since.

Trailer

About Enough Is Enough:
The work of Enough Is Enough is twofold. First, we accompany people going through the criminal justice system who have experienced police brutality, racial profiling, and harassment by the Rochester Police Department. We offer emotional and tactical support, demystify the law, attend court proceedings, and provide direct support e.g. rides to meetings with lawyers or court appearances; and secondly, we work toward systemic change in law enforcement through policy recommendations supported by aggregate data and personal testimonies of police violence in our community.

About the film and discussion series:
Enough Is Enough (EIE) has been an integral part of the campaign to pass the Police Accountability Board (PAB) here in Rochester, NY. It looks as if City Council will act in the spring of 2018. Enough Is Enough and the over 75 supporting organizations and affected individuals have moved into the next chapter of this campaign: getting an ordinance passed by City Council that gives the community control over their police department.

The experiences of systemic police violence, structural racism, poverty, degraded housing stock and red lining, lack of jobs, and inadequate education led many communities of color in cities across the nation, including Newark, NJ, and Rochester, NY, to rebel against the oppressive conditions they faced (and continue to face today). Race rebellions consumed Rochester, NY in July 1964 and Newark, NJ in July 1967. The struggle for racial, political, and economic justice continues in both cities, and across the nation.

Over the next few months, EIE is going to be hosting several film events and discussions culminating in a (hopeful) panel discussion. The purpose is primarily educational: to highlight the similarities between Newark, NJ and Rochester, NY and show how one city, Newark, was able to pass its Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB), which essentially houses all the powers that activists and community members have been demanding for the last half century, and more recently in the proposed PAB, in Rochester:

  1. The PAB must be an agency of the city, independent of the Rochester Police Department (RPD);
  2. The PAB must have independent investigative authority;
  3. The PAB must have subpoena power;
  4. The PAB must have disciplinary power over officers who are found to have committed misconduct; and
  5. The PAB must have the authority to assess, review, and make changes to RPD policies and procedures.

We begin this series with “Revolution ’67.” We will then screen “July ’64” at the end of the month. In March, we will show “Policing the Police,” a documentary updating viewers from 1967 to 2016 where Newark’s new CCRB was passed into law. After this screening, we may screen a new film looking at Oakland, CA’s police department, called “The Force,” and discuss their new Police Commission, a cutting-edge piece of legislation granting disciplinary power among other powers to the Oakland community. Finally, the series will end with an as yet TBA panel discussion possibly with representatives from Newark, Rochester, and Oakland.

The film series has three goals:

  1. to be an educational opportunity to inform the public about the PAB;
  2. to compare Newark and Rochester, the struggles in each city, and highlight the very real possibility of getting a PAB here in Rochester; and
  3. to be a mini fundraiser for EIE.

Documents pertaining to each city will be available for participants to take home and review.

Please join us.

Enough Is Enough!

Jane: An Abortion Service for February Monday Mayhem

In light of the #MeToo movement, the ongoing attacks against abortion providers, and the 45th anniversary of the decision in the case of Roe v. Wade making abortion legal, the Flying Squirrel Community Space will screen “Jane: An Abortion Service” for its February Monday Mayhem programming.

Monday, February 5, 2018
7:00 - 9:00pm
Flying Squirrel Community Space
285 Clarissa St.
Rochester, NY
Suggested donation: $5
Discussion to follow.
Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/946698355479398/

About the Film:
This fascinating political look at a little-known chapter in women's history tells the story of “Jane”, the Chicago-based women's health group who performed nearly 12,000 safe illegal abortions between 1969 and 1973 with no formal medical training. As Jane members describe finding feminism and clients describe finding Jane, archival footage and recreations mingle to depict how the repression of the early sixties and social movements of the late sixties influenced this unique group. Both vital knowledge and meditation on the process of empowerment, Jane: An Abortion Service showcases the importance of preserving women's knowledge in the face of revisionist history.

About Monday Mayhem:
On the first Monday of every month, the Flying Squirrel hosts special programming that forgoes the technical and logistical concerns of running an open-use community space in order to take a closer look at the impact of our actions on the community and our potential as a catalyst for change.

Slingshot organizers (spiral and pocket sized) will also be on sale as a fundraiser for the Flying Squirrel.

Enough Is Enough presents a screening of “Revolution ’67!”

Enough Is Enough presents a screening of “Revolution ’67!”

Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018
7:00pm - 9:00pm
Flying Squirrel Community Space
285 Clarissa St.
Rochester, NY
Suggested donation: $5
Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1546414678739312/

Trailer

About “Revolution ’67”:
Revolution '67 is an illuminating account of events too often relegated to footnotes in U.S. history — the black urban rebellions of the 1960s. Focusing on the six-day Newark, N.J., outbreak in mid-July, Revolution '67 reveals how the disturbances began as spontaneous revolts against poverty and police brutality and ended as fateful milestones in America's struggles over race and economic justice. Voices from across the spectrum — activists Tom Hayden and Amiri Baraka, journalist Bob Herbert, Mayor Sharpe James, and other officials, National Guardsmen and Newark citizens — recall lessons as hard-earned then as they have been easy to neglect since. A co-production with the Independent Television Service (ITVS).

About Enough Is Enough:
The work of Enough Is Enough is twofold. First, we accompany people going through the criminal justice system who have experienced police brutality, racial profiling, and harassment by the Rochester Police Department. We offer emotional and tactical support, demystify the law, attend court proceedings, and provide direct support e.g. rides to meetings with lawyers or court appearances; and secondly, we work toward systemic change in law enforcement through policy recommendations supported by aggregate data and personal testimonies of police violence in our community.

About the film and discussion series:
Enough Is Enough (EIE) has been an integral part of the campaign to pass the Police Accountability Board (PAB) here in Rochester, NY. It looks as if City Council will act in April 2018. Enough Is Enough and the over 75 supporting organizations and affected individuals have moved into the next chapter of this campaign: getting an ordinance passed by City Council that gives the community control over their police department.

The experiences of systemic police violence, structural racism, poverty, degraded housing stock and red lining, lack of jobs, and inadequate education led many communities of color in cities across the nation, including Newark, NJ, and Rochester, NY, to rebel against the oppressive conditions they faced. Race rebellions consumed Rochester, NY in July 1964 and Newark, NJ in July 1967. The struggle for racial, political, and economic justice continues in both cities to this day, and across the nation.

Over the next few months, EIE is going to be hosting several film events and discussions culminating in a (hopeful) panel discussion. The purpose is to highlight the similarities between Newark, NJ and Rochester, NY and show how one city, Newark, was able to pass its Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB), which essentially houses all the powers that activists and community members have been demanding for the last half century, and more recently in the proposed PAB in Rochester:

  1. The PAB must be an agency of the city, independent of the Rochester Police Department (RPD);
  2. The PAB must have independent investigative authority;
  3. The PAB must have subpoena power;
  4. The PAB must have disciplinary power over officers who are found to have committed misconduct; and
  5. The PAB must have the authority to assess, review, and make changes to RPD policies and procedures.

We begin this series with “Revolution ’67.” We will then screen “July ’64” at the end of the month. In March, we will show “Policing the Police,” a documentary updating viewers from 1967 to 2016 where Newark’s new CCRB was passed into law. After this screening, we may screen a new film looking at Oakland, CA’s police department, called “The Force,” and discuss their new Police Commission, a cutting-edge piece of legislation granting disciplinary power among other powers to the Oakland community. Finally, the series will end with an as yet TBA panel discussion possibly with representatives from Newark, Rochester, and Oakland. Details to be announced!

The film series has three goals:

  1. to be an educational opportunity to inform the public about the PAB;
  2. to compare Newark and Rochester, the struggles in each city, and highlight the very real possibility of getting a PAB here in Rochester; and
  3. to be a mini fundraiser for EIE.

Documents pertaining to each city will be available for participants to take home and review.

Please join us.

Enough Is Enough!

Artists' Statement regarding the Black Lives Matter mural!

[Dug this out of a stack of papers! From the Summer of 2017.]

Roc Paint Division
Wall Therapy Sketch
Artist Statement

Artists–Nzinga Muhammad, age 17, Etana Browne, age 17, & Kaori-Mei Stephens, age 17

Our concept for this mural is Black Lives Matter. It specifically highlights black diversity, with each portrait representing a loose version of the artists. Mei is Afro-Asian, Etana is Afro-Caribbran, and Nzinga is a Black Muslim.

We felt that this concept fits our experiences in America as young black girls, and is also an attempt to reach other young black girls like us who need to see positive representations of blackness and our diversity.

The quote: “Respect existence or expect resistance” was chosen because we felt that our experiences and cultures should be recognized and not whitewashed or erased into society. They should be celebrated and protected.

The magnolia tree adds vibrancy, color, beauty, and life to the wall.

The three artists were also in the press!

And don't forget to check out Roc Paint Division's webpage!

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